Tibiofemoral dislocation

Tibiofemoral dislocation is an injury that can damage the structures supporting the knee joint. Generally, the condition can result to joint instability which can become a lasting issue. The damaged tibial tendons and nerves inside the knee can also trigger long-term pain.

What is the cause?

A tibiofemoral dislocation is due to a direct impact on the knee joint, usually in vehicular accidents. In addition, other forms of trauma that are possible causes include falls or sports injuries.

What are the indications?

An evident sign of tibiofemoral dislocation is intense knee pain. Other symptoms that might be present include:

  • At first, bruising
  • Swelling
  • Deformity of the joint
  • In addition, poor ability to flex the knee
    Tibiofemoral dislocation

    An evident sign of tibiofemoral dislocation is intense knee pain.

  • Lastly, inability to bear any weight or instability

Management of a tibiofemoral dislocation

Unlike with other types of dislocation, a tibiofemoral dislocation requires surgical intervention. The reason for this is that the damage requires repair.

Surgery is not usually necessary right away. The doctor will wait up for up to 3 weeks after the injury to allow the swelling to subside. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), application of ice and elevation of the leg are part of treatment initially.

If the knee is filled with fluid, the doctor might perform aspiration to get rid of excess fluid from the joint.

After surgery, a rehabilitation program is recommended by the doctor. This involves stretching and exercises to improve strength, mobility and function of the knee.

Before and after surgery, the doctor will suggest the use of crutches to lessen the pressure on the leg. During treatment and recovery, pain medications are taken.

More Information / Disclaimer

The information posted on this page on tibiofemoral dislocation is for learning purposes only. Learn to recognize the signs of injury by taking a standard first aid course with Red Deer First Aid.

FACT CHECK

https://www.emedicinehealth.com/knee_dislocation/article_em.htm

https://www.healthline.com/health/tibiofemoral-dislocation

https://www.msdmanuals.com/professional/injuries-poisoning/dislocations/knee-tibiofemoral-dislocations

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