Ocular hypertension

Ocular hypertension is defined as pressure in the eyes that is higher than normal, but it does not impair the nerve transmitting visual messages to the brain. The elevated pressure increases the risk for glaucoma. When regular check-up to monitor for any issues, most have good vision. Remember that ocular hypertension is a life-long condition.

It is important to note that an elevated eye pressure does not typically trigger any symptoms.

What are the possible causes?

The elevated pressure is brought about by the buildup of fluid within the eye. The accumulation of fluid in the eye can be caused by the following:

Ocular hypertension

If an individual has high pressure in the eye that does not trigger any issues, treatment is not necessary.

  • An obstruction or tumor that prevents the drainage of fluid from the eye
  • Certain eye diseases
  • Eye injuries
  • Medications such as steroids

An individual is likely to develop ocular hypertension if he/she has:

  • Diabetes
  • Family history of ocular hypertension or glaucoma
  • Severe nearsightedness

In addition, the condition is also common among individuals over 40 years old.

Management of ocular hypertension

If an individual has high pressure in the eye that does not trigger any issues, treatment is not necessary. Glaucoma can be prevented by using eyedrops or other drugs prescribed by the doctor to lessen the pressure in the eyes.

Ocular hypertension could not be prevented but undergoing regular eye examinations can help determine the root cause and prevent glaucoma.

Tags:

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

Please complete this captcha * Time limit is exhausted. Please reload CAPTCHA.